The Piemientos are especially Especial

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Housesitting and the cable box won’t work and uggh I was looking forward to being able to watch more channels than ABC and NBC but I can’t because the stupid box won’t worrkkk and since it’s not our box we can’t just go and replace it or anything bleggh.

(Source: thirstiest)

penis-hilton:

hugcartel:

why is the mom telling her daughter she’s ready to shave?

why is the mom calling her daughter mom

penis-hilton:

hugcartel:

why is the mom telling her daughter she’s ready to shave?

why is the mom calling her daughter mom

alrightevans:

i feel sorry for every teenage girl with the last name cullen bc on every single social media site people are just gonna assume

(Source: alrightevans)

fuckyeah1990s:

someone requested gifs of Lion King spoons from cereal boxes that changed color, here you go.

(Source: emt-monster)

pettyartist:

crateshya:

criedwolves:

kettugasm:

OKAY NO EVERYONE HOLD YOUR HORSES HAVE I GOT SOME GREAT SHIT FOR YOU!!

you see these binders? They may not look much, but these fucking things bind like the CHAINS OF HELL THEMSELVES. I’ve got HUGE tits, up in the DD range, but this simple little binder works some goddamn MAGIC on them. It’s comfortable, it binds, it provides perfect support and whatever the hell else. 

These are perfect for both trans* and crossplay-related purposes! What’s the catch though, right? They’re probably super expensive?

HOW DOES $8.28 WITH FREE SHIPPING SOUND???

i use this binder and as a trans boy i can say first hand that they work really well and i would highly recommend them if you are short on cash and need a good binder. i’m about a D cup and these make me look virtually flat.

ATTENTION. PLEASE DO NOT BUY THESE. THEY’RE DANGEROUS AND CONSTRICT YOU (NOT IN A GOOD BINDING WAY, IN THE VERY VERY LIFE HARMING WAY.)

Please read this. It’s VERY important and it seems to apply to ANY binder that uses that above picture. PLEASE STOP SENDING THIS AROUND THEY’RE NOT GOOD TO USE.

NEVERMIND FOLKS— REBLOG THIS INSTEAD

lightning-and-roses:

toonskribblez:

The fact that this year Easter is on 4/20 just makes this pic even better

blaze it and praise it

lightning-and-roses:

toonskribblez:

The fact that this year Easter is on 4/20 just makes this pic even better

blaze it and praise it

(Source: bcraigv)

perksofahunter:

jamesfactscalvin:

canwriteitbetterthanueverfeltit:

stand-up-comic-gifs:

Joan Rivers on the Ed Sullivan Show, 1967 (x)

HOW IN THE WORLD DID SHE TALK LIKE THIS BACK THEN AND END UP HOSTING A SHOW TEARING APART WHAT PEOPLE LOOK FOR A FRIGGING LIVING????

47 years in Hollywood and several thousand dollars in plastic surgery does that to a person.

You either die a hero or live long enough to see yourself become a villain. 

nazerine:

heremywords:

missyay:

nazerine:

excessivecompulsive:

nazerine:

the anti vaccination movement basically consists of random people with no knowledge of medicine going “I can medicine better than doctors” and it would be hilarious if it wasn’t literally killing people

you dont need vaccines, I havent had any and Im still doing great

wow, what a compelling argument. you’ve got me

in other news, i am still alive therefore death must be a myth

How much research have you done on these toxins you’re putting in your body? Also all the kids that have died from getting the measles or polio are the kids that got vaccinated.

this just in, everybody: the tens thousands of deaths and hundreds of thousands of disabilities caused by polio between its identification in 1908 and the introduction of vaccines in the early 1950s were, in fact, caused retroactively by those very vaccines

yerawizardbarry:

when you need to cough in an exam but you’ve already coughed like twice so you just sit there suffocating

thisandthathistoryblog:

hjuliana:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:


A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.
If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.
Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.
Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL

I found something too awesome not share with you! 
I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same!

thisandthathistoryblog:

hjuliana:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:

A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.

If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.

Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.

Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL

I found something too awesome not share with you! 

I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same!

(Source: wine-loving-vagabond)

pleatedjeans:

apparently, you can name a bird if you adopt it. [x]

pleatedjeans:

apparently, you can name a bird if you adopt it. [x]

idontwannahurtno-more:

This.

idontwannahurtno-more:

This.

Well anyway.

Here’s some crappy animals I did for a project last year. It’s a sample of a playing card deck where every card number(?) has a different animal species on it. I’m working on doing up a better one, where not only is there a different species per card… face?, but there’s a different breed per suit. (Hence why I had to switch the turkey from an 8 to a Joker - there’s only two breeds of turkey, apparently).

Oh, yeah, it’s all watercolor, except the outline is China Marker (aka grease pencil), and the color of the outlines was changed in Photoshop (and I Had trouble getting the outlines on right, hence the more noticeable shadow on the bull’s outline).

I like the cow.